Victora right on Chau

On Wednesday, a letter to the editor admonished Wendy Victora and her opinion piece (“Save your own soul first,” Dec. 1) about John Chau and his misguided attempts to “save” the Sentinelese from themselves and the wrath of god, whatever that means.

I think she was right on target with her words. These people have been there for more than 50,000 years, minding their own business, living like they desired. 

It is the epitome of arrogance to believe that it is necessary to push one’s own beliefs down the throats of everyone else. 

Woody Curle, Navarre 

 

Chau's behavior another poor decision 

I am sure that many readers will lament the completely avoidable murder of missionary Chau. They will probably say he should be respected for trying to bring God's word to the heathen. But what did his act of foolishness accomplish? The loss of a dedicated person who will no longer be able to proselytize anywhere. Please don't misunderstand my cynicism - I am very active in my church.

In a similar sense, for many, many years our Department of State has warned against traveling to the Democratic Peoples' Republic of Korea. Indeed, for many years it has even prohibited such visits. But yet there are those who feel entering the DPRK will show their intellectual free-mindedness, courage, or sense of adventure. So, they take circuitous routes through some European travel agencies to avoid getting their passports stamped upon entry. Once there they delight in doing things they know are illegal or ill-advised, such as leaving a Bible in a public restroom, asking minders to help find a resident of a city which he helped destroy during the Korean War, getting obnoxiously drunk and entering forbidden locations, or trying to talk with North Korean citizens.

And then what happens? The NK government predictably collars them and our misguided Americans expect our country to use its limited political capital in Pyongyang to rescue them. And we have done it much to the glee of North Korea's dictatorship which delights in publicizing our groveling on the international stage.

Douglass Bacon, Niceville