Tuscaloosa Police are investigating after someone drove a pickup truck through Greenwood Cemetery, one of the city's oldest cemeteries, from 28th Avenue through the Stillman Boulevard intersection.

Tuscaloosa Police are investigating after someone drove a pickup truck through one of the city's oldest cemeteries, leaving behind broken fences, damaged tombstones and two headlights and a truck grill.

One of the most damaged stones marked the grave of 2-year-old Louisa Fitts, who died 154 years ago on Oct. 6, 1865.

A road worker discovered the damage at Greenwood Cemetery early Friday morning and reported it to the city.

It appears that someone drove a Dodge Ram from 28th Avenue through the Stillman Boulevard intersection and through the iron fence that surrounds the cemetery.

Gravestones and a small fence inside the cemetery were damaged, as well as part of the exterior fence along Stillman Boulevard behind Van Hoose and Steele Funeral Home. 

The truck is a 2013-2016 Dodge Ram with heavy front-end damage, said TPD spokesman Lt. Teena Richardson. The damage occurred either late Thursday night or early Friday. Police are investigating it as a hit-and-run.

The first grave in the city-maintained cemetery is marked 1821, but it's believed the cemetery was in use as early as 1819. The damage occurred in the northeast corner of the cemetery, Section 3, where some of the earliest graves are located. Many of the damaged markers were in the plot of the Rev. Philip Augustus Fitts, who was 61 when he died in 1900. The tombstone marking his grave had been dragged several yards and was overturned.

The stone marking the grave of his 7-year-old son Phillip Augustus Fitts Jr. was broken into several pieces. The stone for Augustus Perkins, born in 1816 and died in 1883, was also shattered.

Anyone with information can contact CrimeStoppers at 205-752-STOP (7867).